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Coyote
Rescue, Rehabilitate & Educate

Pacific Wildlife Care has been serving wildlife in the San Luis Obispo area since 1984.

Owl
Who We Are

Donors, volunteers & staff working together to support the wildlife of San Luis Obispo County through rehabilitation and educational outreach.

Ducks
What We Do

Pacific Wildlife Care treats nearly 3,000 wild animal patients every year, from over 200 different species. Our goal? To return healthy animals to the wild! We also provide educational presentations for local organizations and schools.

Raccoon
Why it Matters

"Wildlife rehabilitation is a process of coming to know something quite unlike you, to understand it well enough not only to keep it alive but also to put it back, like a puzzle piece, into the gap in the world it left behind."
-- Helen Macdonald, author of H is for Hawk.

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Behind the Scenes at PWC

Pacific Wildlife Care (PWC) has been an advocate for wildlife in San Luis Obispo County since 1984. 

From that time we have grown from a small group of dedicated home rehabilitators into a successful non-profit organization with a well-equipped rehabilitation center, a full-time wildlife veterinarian, a small paid staff, and nearly 200 volunteers.  In addition to the Rehabilitation Center, which is open every day of the year, we maintain a Wildlife Hotline that the public can call to report distressed wildlife (injured, sick, orphaned) and to receive information about our local wildlife.

Home-Wildlife Rehabilitation & Education

The Latest from PWC

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Facebook Posts

🌼 Spring is fast approaching. Be extra cautious with yard projects during the spring season... carefully check before tree trims and mowing! These orphans lost their nest and mother last year when their nest was destroyed. Please call PWC for guidance. Thank you!

📸 Sharon K.

#wildlife #cottontail #brushrabbit #jackrabbit #wildlifeeducation #babybird #Spring
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2 days ago
February is National Bird Feeding Month!🐦‍⬛🪺 Many bird enthusiasts enjoy setting out seed and nectar feeders and watching the feathery friends flock to their yard! In the winter months when the days are short and food is sparse, many birds rely on feeders for survival, but these feeders can spread disease and deadly bacteria if they’re not cared for properly. You should be cleaning seed feeders at least every two weeks with either a diluted bleach solution, or a white vinegar solution. With both methods, a ratio of 1 part bleach or white vinegar to 9 parts water is ideal. Soaking the feeder in this solution will kill any diseases, mold, or bacteria on the feeder that can be harmful and potentially deadly to birds. You should let the feeder dry and then refill with the seeds of your choice! Hummingbird feeders should be cleaned and the sugar water should be replaced every 3 to 5 days. You can follow the same steps to create a cleaning solution for these feeders. Sugar water can be created with 1 cup of boiling water to ¼ cup of sugar ratio. The sugar solution in hummingbird feeders can ferment, mold, and breed harmful bacteria that can hurt and even kill hummingbirds if left for too long. Cleaning feeders regularly and effectively is a necessary step to care for these amazing creatures! Setting your feeders in protected areas is also a key step in keeping the birds that come to visit safe. Ensuring your bird feeder is away from areas frequented by free-roaming cats and placed in a covered spot to protect them from predators such as hawks are both important to keeping your birds happy and healthy! Happy birding! 🪺🪶 #NationalBirdFeedingMonth #birdfeeding #birdfeeder #songbird #hummingbird

February is National Bird Feeding Month!🐦‍⬛🪺

Many bird enthusiasts enjoy setting out seed and nectar feeders and watching the feathery friends flock to their yard! In the winter months when the days are short and food is sparse, many birds rely on feeders for survival, but these feeders can spread disease and deadly bacteria if they’re not cared for properly.

You should be cleaning seed feeders at least every two weeks with either a diluted bleach solution, or a white vinegar solution. With both methods, a ratio of 1 part bleach or white vinegar to 9 parts water is ideal. Soaking the feeder in this solution will kill any diseases, mold, or bacteria on the feeder that can be harmful and potentially deadly to birds. You should let the feeder dry and then refill with the seeds of your choice!

Hummingbird feeders should be cleaned and the sugar water should be replaced every 3 to 5 days. You can follow the same steps to create a cleaning solution for these feeders. Sugar water can be created with 1 cup of boiling water to ¼ cup of sugar ratio. The sugar solution in hummingbird feeders can ferment, mold, and breed harmful bacteria that can hurt and even kill hummingbirds if left for too long. Cleaning feeders regularly and effectively is a necessary step to care for these amazing creatures!

Setting your feeders in protected areas is also a key step in keeping the birds that come to visit safe. Ensuring your bird feeder is away from areas frequented by free-roaming cats and placed in a covered spot to protect them from predators such as hawks are both important to keeping your birds happy and healthy!

Happy birding! 🪺🪶

#NationalBirdFeedingMonth #birdfeeding #birdfeeder #songbird #hummingbird
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3 days ago
Seabirds and more seabirds! We have seen an increase in the past couple of weeks of seabirds in need of help along our coast. Many are starving and some are oiled. The oil is from natural seepages in the ocean that is getting kicked up from all the recent storms. As the birds dive and swim, they can come in contact with the oil which damages their feathers and destroys their waterproofing. Being waterproof is essential to their survival. Oiled birds require specialized care to clean and decontaminate their feathers properly and to get them waterproof again. Seabirds spend their lives on water and only beach themselves when sick or oiled. If you find a seabird on shore, please do not put it back in the water as that will only further exhaust it. Their best chance of survival is to get to a wildlife rehabilitator ASAP for an evaluation and treatment. These birds are eating a lot of fish! Please consider helping us feed and care for them by donating. Any small amount is greatly appreciated. Thank you! 📸 Sophie S. #wildlife #seabirds #murre #grebe #loon #oiledwildlife #donateforacauseImage attachmentImage attachment+2Image attachment

Seabirds and more seabirds! We have seen an increase in the past couple of weeks of seabirds in need of help along our coast. Many are starving and some are oiled. The oil is from natural seepages in the ocean that is getting kicked up from all the recent storms. As the birds dive and swim, they can come in contact with the oil which damages their feathers and destroys their waterproofing. Being waterproof is essential to their survival. Oiled birds require specialized care to clean and decontaminate their feathers properly and to get them waterproof again. Seabirds spend their lives on water and only beach themselves when sick or oiled. If you find a seabird on shore, please do not put it back in the water as that will only further exhaust it. Their best chance of survival is to get to a wildlife rehabilitator ASAP for an evaluation and treatment.
These birds are eating a lot of fish! Please consider helping us feed and care for them by donating. Any small amount is greatly appreciated. Thank you!

📸 Sophie S.

#wildlife #seabirds #murre #grebe #loon #oiledwildlife #donateforacause
... See MoreSee Less

6 days ago
Barn Owl boxes are a great way to observe wildlife and control rodents on your property but it’s also important to clean them out! Recently, Pacific Wildlife Care has had young Barn Owls come in with accumulation of dirt, debris and food on their feathers and burns on their feet. These birds often develop skin infections from the contaminated matter in the box. It is important that the box be properly made, located appropriately, and that rodenticides are not used. It is also important to clean out owl boxes annually once all the young have fledged, which usually means in early fall but if your box has no occupants in them now.. then please clean it! This helps prevent these birds from getting sick from the decaying organic matter left in the box from the previous year which is a hazard to the fragile, young owls. Using a brush or cloth while wearing a dust mask and gloves, remove all the debris in the box. That will leave a safe, clean box for these graceful inhabitants to start their next family. 🦉 For more info on Barn Owls and Barn Owl Boxes click here— https://www.barnowltrust.org.uk/barn-owl-nestbox/ 🦉 Barn Owls raising a family will eat almost 4,000 rodents in a year! For info on birds of prey and utilizing rodent control without the use of poisons click here— Raptors Are The Solution (RATS) www.raptorsarethesolution.org/ 📸 Wild Barn Owl photo credit to the amazing wildlife photographer, Donald Quintana Nature and Wildlife Photography- www.donaldquintana.com #BarnOwl #RaptorsAreTheSolution #RATS #BarnOwlBox #BirdsOfPrey #PoisonFreeFood #NationalNestBoxWeekImage attachmentImage attachment+1Image attachment

Barn Owl boxes are a great way to observe wildlife and control rodents on your property but it’s also important to clean them out! Recently, Pacific Wildlife Care has had young Barn Owls come in with accumulation of dirt, debris and food on their feathers and burns on their feet. These birds often develop skin infections from the contaminated matter in the box. It is important that the box be properly made, located appropriately, and that rodenticides are not used. It is also important to clean out owl boxes annually once all the young have fledged, which usually means in early fall but if your box has no occupants in them now.. then please clean it! This helps prevent these birds from getting sick from the decaying organic matter left in the box from the previous year which is a hazard to the fragile, young owls. Using a brush or cloth while wearing a dust mask and gloves, remove all the debris in the box. That will leave a safe, clean box for these graceful inhabitants to start their next family.

🦉 For more info on Barn Owls and Barn Owl Boxes click here— www.barnowltrust.org.uk/barn-owl-nestbox/

🦉 Barn Owls raising a family will eat almost 4,000 rodents in a year! For info on birds of prey and utilizing rodent control without the use of poisons click here— Raptors Are The Solution (RATS) www.raptorsarethesolution.org/

📸 Wild Barn Owl photo credit to the amazing wildlife photographer, Donald Quintana Nature and Wildlife Photography- www.donaldquintana.com

#BarnOwl #RaptorsAreTheSolution #RATS #BarnOwlBox #BirdsOfPrey #PoisonFreeFood #NationalNestBoxWeek
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7 days ago

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Info

Mailing Address: PO Box 1134, Morro Bay, CA 93443
Center Hours: 8:30 am - 5:00 pm daily
with extended hours April to September
Wildlife Hotline Hours: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm daily
with extended hours April to September
501c3 number: 77-0196350

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Our mission is to support San Luis Obispo County wildlife through rehabilitation and educational outreach.